A New Low

I was talking with my mom and her friend the other day about family heirlooms.  It seems that some of her friend’s children just don’t feel the value of inherited items such as their grandmothers china sets, their great-grandmother’s silver flatware or even their jewelry.  I wondered if the value, or lack thereof, transcends into Grandmother herself.  It seems that euthanasia is growing in it’s support so it would appear that along with her china and her mother’s flatware, no one wants Grandma any more either.
There’s a woman, whom I will call Diane.  I have known her for sometime now, longer than some of her husbands.  She was in a conversation and said to her friend, who was having difficulties with her husband, “I get rid of them once they start to cause me trouble.  It’s not worth the hassle.”  Presently, as far as I know, she is on her third husband.  She isn’t yet fifty.
I have another friend, Michelle, who is in her second marriage.  Last summer, there were problems in that relationship and the couple was preparing to separate.  Michelle had already become involved with someone else and was preparing to enter into marriage number three.  Michelle isn’t even forty yet.
Then I hear the news of, what I think, is a new low and serves to highlight how little we place value on what should truly matter. 
It seems that St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia is reviving “A centuries-old tradition of providing abandoned babies safe harbour in hospitals …Starting Monday, the Angel’s Cradle program will be available to desperate mothers who need to abandon their babies anonymously.”
How sad it has become that we actually “need” this.  We have put a limit on the number of garbage bags we place out at the curb before paying extra, we are not permitted to idle our vehicles for more than two minutes without the possibility of a fine, we need to seek a city permit if we want to build a shed larger than 100 square feet, our lawn must be kept to certain length, but feel free to abandon your child with no questions asked.
As mentioned it is being touted as a resurgence of a centuries old practice of allowing a safe place for children.  I don’t buy it.  It’s really just another means of shirking our responsibility without repercussions.  A radio commentator today explained that this new program should reduce the occurrence of “dumpster babies.”  You know what else could reduce the occurrence of dumpster babies?  Morals.  Abstinence.  Marriage and family.    
Instead of taking a stand and risking offending someone, lets just take one more step in the decline of culture.  Forget morals and values, who needs ‘em.
Everyone has a story.  Even the abandoned children in our modern country.  I wonder what they will tell the next generation?
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2 thoughts on “A New Low

  1. "You know what else could reduce the occurrence of dumpster babies? Morals. Abstinence. Marriage and family."You're right, but unfortunately it's not happening. This is not meant to be a solution for unwanted babies, it's an attempt to keep these babies alive. Why so against it?

  2. Interesting question. Let me first first look at my statement "You know what else could reduce the occurrence of dumpster babies? Morals. Abstinence. Marriage and family." It's not happening because we, our culture, our treasured society, is failing to pay attention to the basics and what really matters. That's our fault. That's the fault of the people who are failing to live up to a standard of accountability. To clarify, I am not "against" the virtual baby drop box. Rather what I am saying is a commentary on how terribly sad that we have allowed ourselves to come to this point where we treat used library books with more 'respect' that we do a human life. With an overdue book, there's a fine. With an unwanted human life…nothing.I am tremendously grateful, as an adopted person myself, that there are services in place. It's just a shame it has come to anonymous drop zones for babies.

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